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The 26-word Alphabet Gospel Story

I recently came across a creative writing assignment that asks the writer to compose a 26 word story utilizing each letter in the alphabet in order.  No extra words are allowed and it must make sense.  I thought I would give it a go with Christmas in mind.  Feel free to try your own, but this is what I came up with:

(I cheated on the “x”)

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

Arriving bundled, Christ descended, entered futility – God himself incarnate.  Jesus, knowing love makes new obedience possible, quietly reaped sins transfer ushering victory with x-alted, yielded zeal.

 

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The Call of the Magi

Surreal glow in western sky
Appeared as though to draw us nigh

What wonder does this starlight call
On such as we to leave our all 

And journey forth to unknown lands
‘Twas the star’s summoning hand

Should we tarry to find its source
No, ’tis but One with such force

To steer the heavens against their will
His power deserves our lowest kneel 

Thus we go, unknowing much
But having felt a majestic touch 

Expecting crowds of searchers here
Unknowing faces and silence near

Where is he, the King of Jews
God himself hath brought us news

Do you not know of this great deed
Sir, ma’am – do you not take heed

The Babe’s been born from virgin womb
Awaken from your sleeping doom

The star goes on and thus we do
But plead with all to follow too

We reach the Child and thus bow down
Our gifts we give for His renown

Gazing upon His divine face
Knowing then, ’twas sheer grace

The star He sent across the land
A call that created its demand

The Tension of the Incarnation

As the beginning of Advent draws near (this Sunday), I thought I would share the words* of Melito of Sardis, the bishop of Sardis in the 2nd century. In each of these phrases, he seems to have captured at least a part of the biblical tension we need to have when we think of the Incarnation. May these truths be a blessing to you and cause your heart to turn to our Savior in worship.

Though he was incorporeal, he formed for himself a body like ours.

He appeared as one of the sheep; yet, he remained the Shepherd.

He was esteemed a servant; yet he did not renounce being a Son.

He was carried about in the womb of Mary, yet he was clothed in the nature of this Father.

He walked on the earth, yet he filled heaven.

He appeared as an infant, yet he did not discard his eternal nature.

He was invested with a body, but it did not limit his divinity.

He was esteemed poor, yet he was not divested of this riches.

He needed nourishment because he was man, yet he did not cease to nourish the entire world, because he is God.

He put on the likeness of a servant, yet it did not impair the likeness of his Father.

He was everything by his unchangeable nature.

He was standing before Pilate, and at the same time he was sitting with his Father.

He was nailed on a tree, yet he was the Lord of all things.

(*Taken from Gregg Allison’s rendering of the original in his Historical Theology.)

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On a related note, here’s what I wrote last year leading into Advent, and what I wrote the day after Christmas.

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